Conservative party

 


Boris Johnson’s victory in the Conservative leadership election could lead to a flurry of tax changes when MPs return to the Commons in the autumn. The former Mayor of London – sometimes referred to in the media as ‘Bo Jo’ – won the contest with a promise to both cut taxes and increase spending on schools and the police. However, his most significant pledge is that Britain will leave the EU on 31 October 2019, in a ‘no deal’ scenario if necessary.

The two contenders to be the next Conservative party leader – and the next Prime Minister – both announced additional proposals for tax cuts this week, as ballot papers went out to the 160,000 party members.

The two contenders to be the next Conservative party leader – and the next Prime Minister – continued their campaigns this week. Both former foreign secretary Boris Johnson and the current foreign secretary Jeremy Hunt spoke less about tax this week than in previously weeks. They have to convince the 160,000 party members to vote for them, with the final result to be announced during the week of 22 July. There will be a head-to-head debate on ITV on 9 July. 

The new Conservative party leader – and the next Prime Minister – will be either the former foreign secretary Boris Johnson or the current foreign secretary Jeremy Hunt. They have to convince the 160,000 party members to vote for them, with the final result to be announced during the week of 22 July. There will be a head-to-head debate on ITV on 9 July. 

After the first round of voting by MPs, six candidates remain in the Conservative leadership election, and tax remains a key policy battleground in the contest, second only to Brexit. 

The Prime Minister Theresa May officially steps down as the leader of the Conservative Party today (Friday), but will remain as Prime Minister until her successor is chosen. She announced her resignation two weeks ago, saying it was a matter of deep regret that she had been unable to deliver Brexit. Tax is a battleground in the leadership contest. A number of candidates and putative candidates have called for tax cuts, both generally and specifically.