Management of Taxes

 


On L-Day, the government published draft clauses to help tackle the hidden economy which introduce a check on tax registration (‘conditionality’) for applications made by individuals, companies and partnerships (including LLPs) for licences to drive taxis and / or private hire vehicles (PHVs), operate a PHV business or deal in scrap metal from 4 April 2022.  This includes the following new measures:

On L-Day, the government published draft clauses which amend HMRC’s civil information power by: 

This measure introduces proposals to tackle promoters (and other enablers) of tax avoidance schemes that would reduce the scope for promoters (and other enablers) to market tax avoidance schemes.

On L-Day, the government published draft clauses to make a series of changes to existing tax avoidance legislation, alongside a consultation document which contains a series of detailed questions.  The proposals are designed to strengthen the existing regimes and to change the behaviour of those involved in promoting and enabling tax avoidance schemes.

The House of Commons Public Accounts Committee (PAC) has published a report that looks at Management of Tax Reliefs. In it the PAC argues that the Government knows too little about the tax reliefs it provides: whether they work, or offer value for money, or even how much they actually cost.

HMRC has announced1 that, from April 2023, self-employed businesses and landlords with turnover above £10,000 per year will be required to keep digital records and submit income tax updates every three months instead of filing annual self-assessment tax returns.

The Low Incomes Tax Reform Group (LITRG) is urging HMRC to make effective use of the next three years, running full pilots and supporting taxpayers in making the transition to the new system.

Commenting on the publication today of draft legislation and a consultation document on tackling promoters and enablers of tax avoidance schemes, CIOT Tax Policy Director John Cullinane said:

A live blog of the tenth and final public bill committee sitting of Finance Bill 2020 (also known as Finance Bill 2019-21), which took place on 18 June from 2.00pm. MPs debated Labour and SNP new clauses on the Bill's impact on the environment, equalities and the tax gap, among other things. 

A live blog of the ninth public bill committee sitting of Finance Bill 2020 (also known as Finance Bill 2019-21), which took place on 18 June from 11.30am. MPs approved clauses 99-105, including HMRC use of automated processes, and also passed a new clause on extending off-payroll working rules to the private sector.

A live blog of the eighth public bill committee sitting of Finance Bill 2020 (also known as Finance Bill 2019-21), which took place on Tuesday 16 June 2020 from 2.00pm. Clauses 86-98 were passed, covering (among other things) Air Passenger Duty, various environmental taxes, international trade disputes, .HMRC priority on insolvency, phoenixism and the GAAR.