EU & Human Rights

 


The Chartered Institute of Taxation (CIOT) respond to the Treasury Committee inquiry Tax after coronavirus.

Normal politics were on hold at the online Conservative Party Conference, with shortened speeches and curtailed policy debate. The Chancellor committed himself to putting the “overwhelming might of the British state” at the service of struggling businesses and workers, but said that the books would need to be balanced eventually. On the fringe, and in media interviews and reports, there are clues as to which taxes are likely to rise. 

The Chartered Institute of Taxation (CIOT) respond to the Ministry of Justice consultation on Retained EU case law.

The Chartered Institute of Taxation (CIOT) respond to the Treasury Committee inquiry in to the Spring Budget 2020

Further directions issued today by the President of the First-tier tax tribunal, Judge Sinfield, to the Tax Chamber and Tribunal users extending, in relation to certain proceedings, the general stay of all proceedings released on 24 March (as amended and released on 26 March).

A delegated legislation committee considered three statutory instruments that will be needed in the event of a ‘no deal’ Brexit:

The CIOT comments sent to HMT on the Stamp Duty Land Tax: non-UK resident surcharge consultation.

MPs got a final chance to amend this year’s Finance Bill with today’s report stage debate. Government amendments on intangible fixed assets and entrepreneurs’ relief were passed. A cross-party proposal to amend the Bill to hinder government preparations for a ‘no deal’ Brexit was passed. Another cross-party proposal for a review including consideration of the 2019 loan charge was accepted by the government.

Last week, the European Commission and UK Government published its draft Withdrawal Agreement on the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. Also published was a seven page political declaration on the UK’s vision of a future EU-UK relationship. Our initial thoughts on what this means for VAT, Customs and Excise duties are set out in this blog although further analysis is needed to do justice to the 585 page withdrawal agreement, plus explanatory notes.

The draft Withdrawal Agreement published on Wednesday sets out the terms of the UK’s exit from the EU, including a Protocol on Northern Ireland. It reflects agreement in principle between the UK and EU negotiating teams on the full legal text. The government intends to lay a final version of the agreement before Parliament once it is finalised. The outline of the Political Declaration on the future relationship sets out progress on the scope of the framework for the future relationship. Negotiations are ongoing to finalise the Political Declaration.